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6 Hidden Features On The Fuji X-T1

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6 Hidden Features On the X-T1

When was the last time you dived into your camera’s menu or explored its unknown features?

With the Fujifilm X-T1 camera in the hands of many of you around the world, I thought it would be fitting to mention a few ‘hidden’ features that you might not be aware of.

If you haven’t found time to update your X-T1’s firmware to Version 3.00 then now’s the perfect time. You can download the latest firmware here.

Ensuring you have the newest firmware installed try out these six features, I’m sure many of you may find them quite handy, please share if you do.




Take Multiple Exposures Using the Self Timer

If you’re like me and find yourself out and about capturing long time exposures only to find you’ve left your remote release behind then here’s the perfect fix:

Turn the Drive Dial to Continuous High (CH) and then press the camera’s Q button to open up the Quick Menu. Navigate to the Self Timer and set it to 2 Seconds (2).

What this will do is capture three consecutive photos with one press of the shutter button. This is the perfect setting if you’re capturing any type of long exposure as the self timer will ensure there’s no camera shake when you press the shutter button.

Fujifilm XT1 Self Timer and CH

Changing the Focus Area Size

I’ve heard some people can struggle with focus so if you hear someone mentioning this – tell them this.

Press the Down Arrow located below the MENU/OK button. Now turn the dial located in-between the AE-L & AF-L Buttons on the camera’s body.

This will then change the size of the camera’s focus area. You can also press the arrow keys (located around the MENU/OK button) to select the desired focus point.

I personally use this resizing feature when I’m using the XF 60mm f2.4 Macro Lens or when I’m photographing wide open on either the XF 56mm f1.2 or XF 56mm f1.2 APD lens.

Fujifilm XT1 Focus Areas

Change Your Camera’s Function Buttons

Here’s a hidden feature that will make your photography experience more personal.

All you have to do is hold the Display/Back (DISP BACK) button down for a couple of seconds. 

This extended press will open up the Function Setting Menu (Fn) where you’ll be able to assign up to 22 different features to one of six function buttons found on the camera.

After pressing the DISP BACK button, highlight the Function Button (Fn1 – Fn6) you want to assign.  All you need to do now is press the Right Arrow (next to the MENU/OK button) and you will be able to assign one of the following settings to that specific button;

DRV – Bracketing / Advanced Setting, Macro – Macro Mode, Preview Depth of Field, ISO Auto Setting, Self-Timer, Image Size, Image Quality, Dynamic Range, Film Simulation, White Balance, AF Mode, Focus Area, Select Custom Setting, Face Detection, RAW, Aperture Setting, Wireless Communication, Flash Compensation, Shutter Type, Preview EXP./WB in Manual Mode, Preview Pic. Effect and Lock Setting.

You can also do the same thing by bypassing some of the steps mentioned above. Simply hold the function button you want to change down and the same menu will appear.

Fujifilm XT1 Function Buttons

Change the Way You Can Focus

If you’ve come from another brand, like Canon, Sigma or Nikon, you’ll have to turn the focus ring in different directions to achieve focus. It’s clear that the team behind the X-T1 where aware of this. That’s why there’s a mode that will let you select the turning direction to focus. To change this setting follow these steps:

Press the MENU/OK button and then press the left arrow (located next to the MENU/OK button) to highlight the Shooting Menu Tab. Press the down arrow (located next to the MENU/OK button) six times. Press the right arrow and scroll down to the setting called FOCUS RING. Now press the right arrow and select the Clock Wise (CW) or Counter Clock Wise (CCW) setting by pressing the MENU/OK button.

Now it doesn’t matter if you’ve come from a Nikon or Canon camera, there’s no excuse to focus in the ‘wrong’ or ‘right’ direction.

Fujifilm XT1 Focus Ring Menu

Prevent the Accidental Pressing of Buttons

Do you have clumsy or big hands that accidentally keep pressing buttons? The X-T1 has a great little feature for you.

Press and hold the MENU/OK button down for a few seconds. A Control Lock OFF symbol will then appear.

Doing this will disable the Quick Menu (Q) as well as the arrow keys (located around the MENU/OK button).

I find this a great mode to use at night when I’m photographing the stars at night. The last thing I want to do is press the wrong button on the back, which would result in changing the camera’s settings. This mode stops that from happening.

Fujifilm XT1 Press The Menu Button

Turn On Faster Focus

Are you finding the focus on your X-T1 isn’t the best it could be? Try using this mode that will give you faster focus.

Press the MENU/OK button followed pressing the left arrow (located to the left of the MENU/OK button). Now press the down arrow six times and select Power Management (located within the Set-Up Menu). Scroll down to High Performance and select ON. 

Turning the High Performance mode ON will give you faster focus as well as reduce the time needed to restart the camera after it has been turned off.

Fujifilm XT1 Performance Mode

I hope you all enjoy diving in to these ‘hidden’ features. Remember if you find any of them helpful please share with your friends. We look forward to seeing you all at the Fiji 2015 Workshop too :)

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