AdobeMAX Early Development Previews – Closer to Actually “Photoshopping” It?

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At AdobeMAX, Adobe’s yearly back slapping get together, the techies have been showing off early development tools that are to a stage able to be demonstrated to halls full of reporters and fan boys of what could be integrated into our workhorse programs in future years. Remember the “Deblur” preview a few years ago? Something world changing it looked at the time (I even put aside a collection of images I expected to be fixed by it), but once it arrived in the form of “Shake Reduction” in Photoshop 2 years later, it didn’t quite deliver as I certainly envisaged… Some previewed tech has been great when released or continued to improve though – i.e. Content aware fill.

Well on their Youtube stream  Adobe have put together a few sneaks from the halls of AdobeMAX. Two videos that jumped out at me and concern photographic post-processing directly are these…

Defog

It might just be me being a British Landscaper, loving the demure, but why would anyone want to remove fog from an image?! Fog is our greatest friend when out in the early morning in spring and autumn hunting for the thickest fog possible to capture beautiful damp colourful woodland and the effects of the rising morning light. I’d happily take thick fog over a blazing sunset to make images any day!

They do also have an option to increase haze as well as change its colour too, which they demonstrated to the hall but the director cut to a view of the stage for that part of the demo so there was no way of seeing the example properly. That said, how long has the fog control been part of Color Efex Pro in the NIK Collection?.. Certainly at least the two versions I’ve owned!

 

Next…

Time Of Day

This looked the much earlier in development stage of the two demonstrations.

The premise for this tool is to change the time of day of any outdoors image. Supposedly Adobe have worked with boffins at MIT to build this tool using over 400 timelapses from all times of the day and all over the world to capture the varied colours of day, season and location. This data is then applied in some way to your nominated image to simulate a particular time of day.

The automated example didn’t look great, but the other examples shown where everything had been pre-programmed manually looked perfectly fine!

As time passes and it’s developed further, to me, this could be a useful tool! Maybe not at changing an image from 12 noon to golden hour, but to get peak golden hour light perfect if you miss it by minutes, or if a badly timed cloud passes at the wrong time.

 

These two tools I’m sure will be looked forward to by many, but I’m beginning to question if post-processing of photography needs more “one click” solutions. I’m also wondering if these developers have spent too long in sunny California and have lost touch with a varied world that doesn’t have fast (or any) internet, lives in places where the weather is not dry and hazy 24/7 365 or they think we don’t have time to enjoy the wait for perfect light to appear – thats 90% of the attraction of landscape photography. The wait, the patience, the requirement to return time after time before eventually getting the shot!

We’ll now wait and see how quickly they appear if at all in future updates to the Creative Cloud, who out there can’t wait to see these as inbuilt features?

 

 

For further information on other preview tech demonstrated from across Adobe’s range of products – see their blog post on these possible future tools